Posts

The New Release Pattern

Are you on Update Subscription for RAD Studio?

You are?  Great.  Wise move.

You aren’t?  Why not?

We are very interested in you being on Update Subscription — so much so that you pretty much have to be when you upgrade.  We do this because Update Subscription is really great for you, and not bad for us, either.

It is great for you because you pay less over time.  It is great for you because you always have access to the latest and greatest versions and features.   It is great for you because you can budget annually for your software development tools.

And it is great for you because it incents us to release software when it is ready, and no sooner.  Because we no longer have to wait a whole year or more to release new features (as we did previously without Update Subscription), we can more gradually release features when they are ready.  We don’t have to push a feature to make a date because we know that there’s another date not too far off where we can ship that feature. We don’t have to pile a bunch of features into a single release to make it sound “big”.

For instance, C++ for Linux is proving to be a bit more challenging that we thought.  We originally planned to release C++ for Linux with the 10.2 (Godzilla) release.  But we don’t have to, and so we aren’t.  Instead, we are going to get Delphi for Linux in your hands as soon as possible, and then get C++ for Linux in your hands a bit later, when it is ready.  You get quality software sooner, and later.  We ship Delphi for Linux now, and then in a few short months, we ship C++ for Linux in the 10.2.1 release.

Okay, a little terminology.  Because of the fact that we can — and will — ship new features in all of our releases, we are going to stop  using the word “Update” and start using “Release” for all of our, well, releases.  Why?  One reason is because we find that many customers think of an Update as bug fixes only.  That isn’t true, and we don’t want to give that message by using the word that has meant that in the past.  Another reason is that “Release” connotes newness, and that’s the message we want to send.  So from now on, it’s Releases, not updates.  Everything we ship will be a release.

We can do this because you all are on Update Subscription.  Why is that?  Suffice it to say that it has to do with arcane accounting rules.  I know — that sounds lame, but it’s true.  Trust me, you don’t want to know the details.

Because of Update Subscription, we can now do two or three (or more if we want) releases a year.  We can deliver a constant stream of new features and quality fixes.  We are committed to making that upgrade path as smooth as possible.  We want you to be happy with this steady stream of goodness because we want you to renew your subscription when the time comes.  From now on, we make our money by continuously delighting you, and thus we are highly incented to do that.  That means quality and valuable new features on a steady and continuing basis.  It means we can ship no code before its time.

We have lots in the pipeline to keep you delighted.  We can ship these new features when they are ready.  That’s big win for everyone.

Flotsam and Jetsam #117

  • I can’t seem to find a WordPress theme that I like.  Look for the theme to change a bunch while I play around with different ones. 

  • I’ve started a new blog over on the Embarcadero Community site.  It will be for more “official” stuff that I post about.  You can follow me there as well as here.  Don’t worry, as you can see, Flotsam and Jetsam is still alive and well.
  • Delphi Developer Days is rapidly approaching – and I have a lot of work to do.  There are still a few seats available for Chicago, Baltimore, and Frankfurt.  It’s not too late – we’d love to see you there.  Cary Jensen and I will be doing a session live from our Chicago event at CodeRage XI. 

  • Speaking of CodeRage, it is also not too late to submit a paper to CodeRage XI.  CodeRage is always a great time, and the perfect opportunity to share with people what you are working on and what you know.  The talks are pre-recorded, so, it’s a perfect venue for that developer who has never presented at a conference, but wants to give it a try.   I encourage you to submit a talk even if you are just thinking about it.  What could go wrong? Nothing, that’s what. Smile
  • I’ve posted twice now on RAD Server – once here and also with my first post on my new blog at the community site.  I’d really like you to give it a look.  I really think it can solve the problem that many of you are having: How to modernize your codebase.  It really can do that.
  • Berlin Update 2 – Anniversary Edition is coming soon.  There’s a webinar about it on Thursday if you’d like to attend one of the two time slots. This update represents our new approach to releasing software.  Fewer major feature releases and more smaller, focused feature releases.  Unlike previous updates, Update 2 – Anniversary Edition contains new features.  It represents our commitment to making your Update Subscription an ongoing and valuable asset.

Flotsam and Jetsam #112

  • Been a while, eh? 
  • Obviously the biggest news to cover is the Idera acquisition.  By now I’m sure you all are aware that Idera Software has acquired Embarcadero. (It always seems strange to me when a smaller company bys a bigger one, but never mind….)  They’ve done an interesting thing.  They’ve taken the Embarcadero database tools (what we used to call “DataGear”) and incorporated them into Idera’s software brand.  Then, they’ve left RAD Studio and Interbase under the Embarcadero banner as a separate entity.  I don’t know what the accounting setup is, but it does seem like a separate company altogether.  Neither website mentions the other.  Embarcadero put out a press release stating that they are exclusively focused on development tools, which I really liked to see.  It does seem like Idera wanted the “DataGear” stuff and have now set up “CodeGear” as a separate entity.  What that means I don’t know. But here’s to continued success under the new management.
  • Along those lines, I did have a conversation with Atanas Popov, General Manager for Embarcadero. He was quite confident in things going well as they execute on the roadmap.  He’s actually quite open and accessible – he publishes his email: atanas.popov@idera.com  Don’t be afraid to get in touch with him if you have any questions or issues about the path forward.
  • I can’t vouch for the book, but you can get Delphi Succinctly for free.
  • I will be presenting two days of material at the Danish Delphi User Group at the end of April.  I’m really looking forward to it, not only for the excellent conference, but also because my youngest will be making the trip with me.  I’ve talked at this conference twice before, and it’s always been fun.  If you are in thearea and want to excellent Delphi content (if I do say so myself), then you should attend.
  • My books continue to sell, and I’m very grateful to each and everyone of you that have made a purchase.  If you still want to buy, supplies are unlimited, but don’t let that stop you!  You can buy both books in paper copy, both on  electronic copy from LeanPub, and if you are really excited, you can buy them both as an electronic bundle for a $15 savings.  Again, you have my thanks and gratitude for your purchases.  The books have been way more successful than I ever hoped.
  • The bummer news is, of course, the departure of Allen Bauer from Embarcadero. Allen is a great friend, and I wish him well on his new endeavors at Google. He was with the Delphi team from the very beginnning.  His loss is a blow to the product.  But the team isn’t just one guy, so here’s to others stepping up to fill the void. 
  • Link of the Week:  Giving up on TDD by Uncle Bob.  Apparently a guy named Ian Sommerville “gave up” on TDD, and Uncle Bob refutes his argument. Uncle Bob doesn’t pull his punches.  Good stuff.
  • Flotsam and Jetsam #95

    • Last week I sang the praises of Stefan Glienke.  Well, he has done it again.  He’s released TestInsight – an IDE integration for unit testing.  This is really cool – you can run your tests automatically right in the IDE.  Give it a look – very, very nice stuff.   Plus, it works with all the major unit testing frameworks.
    • Tweet and Quote of the Week:  “As long as managers think programmers are young interchangeable pizza-fed cheaply hired commodities, buggy software will rule the world.”
    • Glad to see that this website is still alive and kicking: http://www.isdelphidead.com/ Hehe.
    • Work on my new book continues apace.  I’ve just started showing chapters to my “beta testers”.  I’m grateful for all the feedback I get.  If you are interested in reading rough drafts of my chapters, you can join the Coding in Delphi group.  It’s a private group, so I’ll have to approve your entry, but that’s usually not a problem.  I welcome and am grateful for any help in making the book better.
    • Next week is Delphi Week.  You can register to participate.   Hard to believe it’s been twenty years.  Seriously?  Great that the product is still rolling along as strong as ever.  I’ll have few thoughts, tweets, and other things to offer as we celebrate.  Keep an eye on this space and the #delphiweek hashtag, as well as the presentations from Embarcadero.  Should be fun.
    • Jim McKeeth does a nice interview with Darren Kosinski, who is a member of the FireMonkey R&D team.  Darren is a friend of mine from my days at Embarcadero and a good guy as well as a brilliant developer.  Give it a listen.